The importance of being stupid

I came across this great article in the Journal of Cell Science via the NY times about the value of stupidity in science. To quote:

For almost all of us, one of the reasons that we liked science in high school and college is that we were good at it. That can’t be the only reason – fascination with understanding the physical world and an emotional need to discover new things has to enter into it too. But high-school and college science means taking courses, and doing well in courses means getting the right answers on tests. If you know those answers, you do well and get to feel smart.

I don’t think students are made to understand how hard it is to do research. And how very, very hard it is to do important research. It’s a lot harder than taking even very demanding courses. What makes it difficult is that research is immersion in the unknown. We just don’t know what we’re doing. 

 Science involves confronting our `absolute stupidity’. That kind of stupidity is an existential fact, inherent in our efforts to push our way into the unknown.Focusing on important questions puts us in the awkward position of being ignorant. One of the beautiful things about science is that it allows us to bumble along, getting it wrong time after time, and feel perfectly fine as long as we learn something each time. 

Read the whole thing here. (And this follow-up is worth a look). 

And, speaking of cells, did anyone else notice that Obama lifted the stem cell ban on monday? There’s an interesting musing on that over at Slate magazine. 

 

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terryman

Sarah Andersen is both a wave and a particle.

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