TEDx Terry Talks, November 5th: Laura Fukumoto, Obesity in Light of the Zombie Apocalypse

TEDx Terry Talks, November 5th: Laura Fukumoto, Obesity in Light of the Zombie Apocalypse by Gordon Katic

Laura Fukumoto is in the third year of her BFA, theatre production and design, with a focus in costumes. She has a passion for teaching, theatre, vintage dresses, is an all-around bohemian and loves to make new friends. Last year she was a residence advisor in Totem Park where she produced, costume designed, vocal coached and helped create a musical and a one act theatre festival. She also enjoyed dressing up for a number of RA events. In her spare time (ha), Laura likes to inspire social change through blogging, writing, and silly videos that she makes instead of writing essays. She believes it is important to keep up-to-date on LBGTQ and feminist issues, because feminism is not scary or outdated or full of angry man-haters, and LBGTQ laws and issues are developing and changing every day. She's also acting in a UBC Theatre production at the end of November, called A Little Creation, written by Vanessa Imeson and directed by Patrick New.

November 5th at the TEDx Terry Talks.
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Gordon Katic (@gordonkatic) has been student coordinator for the Terry Project for over two years, and in that time started BARtalk, and the Terry Project on CiTR 101.9FM. A former Ubyssey columnist, and now a student at the UBC Graduate School of Journalism, Gordon is trying to use journalism to tell important stories about global issues.

3 Responses to “TEDx Terry Talks, November 5th: Laura Fukumoto, Obesity in Light of the Zombie Apocalypse”

  1. T

    Ironic when the leading cause of death in the entire world is heart disease and “that every seven minutes in Canada, someone dies from heart disease or stroke.” Leading cause of this epidemic? Inactivity, Obesity leading to hypertension, high cholesterol and diabetes. I don’t think it is fair that obese people are excluded or ostracized but I think a crusade to make people feel better about slowly killing themselves isn’t the best move. My dad used to have diabetes, I used to be “clinically” depressed. Then we lost weight and got in shape and magically our lives drastically improved. I think people need to take more responsibility and we should instead have campaigns supporting people to get healthy.

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